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alask-uhh:

strugglingtobeheard:

See this why you don’t live with white people

dyingggg

alask-uhh:

strugglingtobeheard:

See this why you don’t live with white people

dyingggg

(via onlylolgifs)

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lifehackable:

More Broke College Student Life Hacks Here
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knightarcana:

fuckyeahplussizealternatives:

toomanyfandomssolittletime:

maahammy:

jadethemerman:

July 28th, 2014: Out and about in New York City

How problematic

im gonna fuckin throw up

Okay, okay calm down, people.

While you are all losing your mind over ‘cultural appropriation” of an Indian dress, nobody actually consulted THE INDIANS. 

In our country, if a foreigner wears an Indian saree, we actually appreciate it. It shows that the foreigner respects us enough to try our clothes. And the saree, mind you, is not a religious thing. Hindus can wear sarees, Muslims can wear sarees, Sikh’s can wear sarees, Jain’s can wear sarees and so on.

Like Americans have short dresses, compare that with sarees. Going to a party? Saree. Going to temple? Saree, and so on.

Some Indians wear it, some don’t. Some hate it and think its oppressing, some love embracing the unique style.

Point is, don’t hate on her for wearing this. Don’t hate on anyone for wearing sarees or any variations of sarees. We love to see others embracing our culture. Why do you think we open our gates to allow everyone to practice yoga and find spiritual meaning?

Culture is not meant to be kept within four walls, it should be spread.

I did not know this. That is really interesting to find out. Thanks for the information.

"Culture is not meant to be kept within four walls, it should be spread."

Whenever I see a post about “Oh that’s cultural appropriation,” nine times out of ten it’s someone from outside that particular culture. They never actually talk to people and find out if it’s actually offensive or whatnot.

(Source: ladyxgaga, via thedisadvantagesofbeinganellie)

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"Is there a problem with my burger?"

(Source: petervquill, via onlylolgifs)

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skeletongod:

hilk


Looks like someone skipped leg day

skeletongod:

hilk

Looks like someone skipped leg day

(Source: pleatedjeans, via thedisadvantagesofbeinganellie)

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skeletongod:

hilk


Looks like someone skipped leg day

skeletongod:

hilk

Looks like someone skipped leg day

(Source: pleatedjeans, via thedisadvantagesofbeinganellie)

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adhoption:

river-b:

motherfuckinoedipus:

abnels:

memeguy-com:

You win this round cheese

actually that is a rectangle cheese

[oxford comma laughing in the distance]

[vocative comma wondering what oxford comma thinks it’s doing here]

I already reblogged this for the pun but I’m reblogging again for the sick punctuation banter

adhoption:

river-b:

motherfuckinoedipus:

abnels:

memeguy-com:

You win this round cheese

actually that is a rectangle cheese

[oxford comma laughing in the distance]

[vocative comma wondering what oxford comma thinks it’s doing here]

I already reblogged this for the pun but I’m reblogging again for the sick punctuation banter

(via awkwardvagina)

Text

dragondicks:

promoting body positivity for larger girls:

image

doing so by throwing skinny girls under the bus, calling thinner girls “fake”, or insisting that being bigger is “what men really want” (implying that any female body type is only good if it has male approval):

image

(via lacigreen)

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catully:

pinkrobotgirl:

fleecedragons:

myheartofgoldturnedplatinum:

alwaysyourbaby:

desert-revolution:


I firmly believe that the reason many Slytherins were easily convinced to join Voldemort was because they were treated like shit by the rest of the houses while they were growing up. Imagine spending seven of the most important years of your life being told that you were part of the bad house and therefore bad yourself. Everyone boos your quidditch team. All the houses will hang out with everyone except you. You grow up being hated by your fellow students and many of your teachers.
Now imagine someone comes along and tells you that you’re not worthless and bad. That you’re invited to join a family where you will right the wrongs committed against you. You have the opportunity to be wanted and powerful instead of a hated outcast. Several of your former classmates are telling you how great it is. How you’re welcomed and needed. These are the kids you grew up with. The classmates who went through all the same things you did. Being a Death Eater sounds pretty good now.

I’ve been waiting for a post like this.

THIS.

BLESS THIS POST

!!!!
thank

I was always bothered by the scene at the end of book 7, when the students are asked whether they want to fight the incoming Death Eater army. The Slytherin students are all like, “Uh. No?” And they’re treated like terrorists for it. In the movie, they’re even locked in the school dungeons while everyone cheers.
Did nobody stop to think and realize that if the Sytherin students had stood and fought, they would have been facing their own parents on a battlefield? Even if some of them weren’t really on board with the whole Death Eater thing, expecting them to fight was just cruel. They were children. The oldest of them were seventeen. Babies. And their own professors were asking them to shoot illegal killing spells at Mum and Dad.
Imagine you are a Slytherin and you are staying behind to defend your school and maybe restore some honor to your House. The other students are all giving you mistrustful glares. You know they’re waiting for you to start hitting them in the back with stunning spells. You consider doing it, too, because you’re already starting to regret the choice you made.
Then the battle begins, and you are up against a crowd of strangers who aren’t strangers at all. You recognize voices, muffled behind masks but still piercingly familiar. Your uncle. Your cousin. Your best friend’s big sister.
And then you see a tall man in expensive grey robes. A moment later you notice the small, curvy woman next to him, wand ready. They are guarding each others backs.
You recognize their shoes.

I always though this. And at the end of The Philosopher’s Stone? Slytherin had worked incredibly hard, and Dumbledore made sure that just enough points were given to students who had done about a million things against the school rules so that they would lose. I think that Slytherin house was victimised a lot, and I kind of  hope now that the likes of Scorpius Malfoy won’t have to go through such prejudice. Perhaps, after the war, people realised that all Slytherins weren’t to blame  Probably not, though.

catully:

pinkrobotgirl:

fleecedragons:

myheartofgoldturnedplatinum:

alwaysyourbaby:

desert-revolution:

I firmly believe that the reason many Slytherins were easily convinced to join Voldemort was because they were treated like shit by the rest of the houses while they were growing up. Imagine spending seven of the most important years of your life being told that you were part of the bad house and therefore bad yourself. Everyone boos your quidditch team. All the houses will hang out with everyone except you. You grow up being hated by your fellow students and many of your teachers.

Now imagine someone comes along and tells you that you’re not worthless and bad. That you’re invited to join a family where you will right the wrongs committed against you. You have the opportunity to be wanted and powerful instead of a hated outcast. Several of your former classmates are telling you how great it is. How you’re welcomed and needed. These are the kids you grew up with. The classmates who went through all the same things you did. Being a Death Eater sounds pretty good now.

I’ve been waiting for a post like this.

THIS.

BLESS THIS POST

!!!!

thank

I was always bothered by the scene at the end of book 7, when the students are asked whether they want to fight the incoming Death Eater army. The Slytherin students are all like, “Uh. No?” And they’re treated like terrorists for it. In the movie, they’re even locked in the school dungeons while everyone cheers.

Did nobody stop to think and realize that if the Sytherin students had stood and fought, they would have been facing their own parents on a battlefield? Even if some of them weren’t really on board with the whole Death Eater thing, expecting them to fight was just cruel. They were children. The oldest of them were seventeen. Babies. And their own professors were asking them to shoot illegal killing spells at Mum and Dad.

Imagine you are a Slytherin and you are staying behind to defend your school and maybe restore some honor to your House. The other students are all giving you mistrustful glares. You know they’re waiting for you to start hitting them in the back with stunning spells. You consider doing it, too, because you’re already starting to regret the choice you made.

Then the battle begins, and you are up against a crowd of strangers who aren’t strangers at all. You recognize voices, muffled behind masks but still piercingly familiar. Your uncle. Your cousin. Your best friend’s big sister.

And then you see a tall man in expensive grey robes. A moment later you notice the small, curvy woman next to him, wand ready. They are guarding each others backs.

You recognize their shoes.

I always though this. And at the end of The Philosopher’s Stone? Slytherin had worked incredibly hard, and Dumbledore made sure that just enough points were given to students who had done about a million things against the school rules so that they would lose. I think that Slytherin house was victimised a lot, and I kind of  hope now that the likes of Scorpius Malfoy won’t have to go through such prejudice. Perhaps, after the war, people realised that all Slytherins weren’t to blame  Probably not, though.

(Source: zaynx, via thedisadvantagesofbeinganellie)

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(Source: cloudytuesday, via ezraffitz)